92nd St – Appalachian Trail (Upper East Side)

11 – Colonial-era porticoes.

11 – Colonial-era porticoes.

Past 3rd Avenue, the Upper East Side begins in earnest.

Here, the landscape changes abruptly, with stately mansions and colonial-era porticoed houses standing in the shadow of slightly more recent tenements and apartments.  There is a period, provincial feel that reminded me, strangely of Appalachia.

Incidentally, the Appalachian Trail begins up in New York State and continues all the way down South till Mississippi and Tennessee.  But here, on 92 Street, one gets a bit of the South, the North and everything in between.

The plant-life here is at its most luxuriant, shifting from deep olive green to shades of gold and vermilion.  It is the perfect complement to those ornate, age-old facades that have stood the test of time, even as the city around them has changed.

*  *  *  *  *

12 – 19th century townhouses.

12 – 19th century townhouses.

13 – More colonial-era architecture.

13 – More colonial-era architecture.

14 – Turn of the century apartments.

14 – Turn of the century apartments.

15 – Flowers by the wayside.

15 – Flowers by the wayside.

16 – The spire of the Brick Presybterian Church, in operation since 1767.  The church buildings was built in 1940.

16 – The spire of the Brick Presybterian Church, in operation since 1767. The church buildings was built in 1940.

17 – Beaux-Arts Apartments.

17 – Beaux-Arts Apartments.

18 – Whartonesque splendour.

18 – Whartonesque splendour.

19 – Close-up of shrub.

19 – Close-up of shrub.

20 – Row of Townhouses.

20 – Row of Townhouses.

21 – Mansion of the wealthy.

21 – Mansion of the wealthy.

22 – Gothic façade of the Jewish Museum.

22 – Gothic façade of the Jewish Museum.

B - Appalachian Trail

B – Appalachian Trail

About Kennie Ting

I am a wandering cityophile and pattern-finder who is pathologically incapable of staying in one place for any long period of time. When I do, I see the place from different perspectives, obsessive-compulsively.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Art & Architecture, Landmarks & History, New York, Photography, Sociology & Urban Studies and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s