The Austro-Hungarian Concession, Tientsin

The highlight of the concession is this Austrian-style house which was once the residence of General Yuan Shikai.

The highlight of the concession is this Austrian-style house which was once the residence of General Yuan Shikai.

The Austro-Hungarian Concession was the smallest and the shortest of the foreign concessions in Tientsin, lasting a mere 16 years from 1901 to 1917.  Like the German Concession, it was surrendered to the Chinese just after World War I ended.

Also like their compatriots, the Austro-Hungarians invested their concession with their own distinctive identity, complete with cathedral, domes and residences straight out of the Austrian alps.

The Concession itself is small and has few architecturally significant buildings.  However, as a whole, these buildings present an imposing, imperial vista from across the Pei Ho.  They have been restored – like everywhere else in the old Concession area in Tientsin – and now hold luxury apartments, restaurants and boutiques.

The Austrian Consulate.

The Austrian Consulate.

The Cathedral

The Cathedral

Austrian style residence.

Austrian style residence.

The Concert Hall/Theatre

The Concert Hall/Theatre

Close-up of one of the imposing imperial buildings.

Close-up of one of the imposing imperial buildings.

View across the river - note the relief of the violinist.

View across the river – note the relief of the violinist.

Imposing view from across the water.

Imposing view from across the water.

The totality of the Austrian Concession taken in...

The totality of the Austrian Concession taken in…

Back where we started.

Back where we started.

Advertisements

About Kennie Ting

I am a wandering cityophile and pattern-finder who is pathologically incapable of staying in one place for any long period of time. When I do, I see the place from different perspectives, obsessive-compulsively.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Art & Architecture, China, Cities & Regions, Culture & Lifestyle, Landmarks & History, Photography, Travel & Mobility and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s