30th St – Boston, 1775 A.D. (Madison to 2nd Ave)

35 – No. 113: a stately black townhouse in the colonial style.

35 – No. 113: a stately black townhouse in the colonial style.

Between Madison and 2nd Avenue sits a slice of colonial Boston, like you’ve never seen before, cobbled together with a diversity of architectural styles from the old world: English, Dutch, Italianate, French.  Here are some of the most beautiful and eclectic townhouses on 30th Street, set against a tranquil landscape of shade trees and flowering shrubs, and belonging to the neighborhood known, anachronistically, as Rose Hill.

The year might as well be 1775.  One half expects Paul Revere to come galloping down the street to warn the citizenry of the arrival of British troops and the advent of the War for Independence. If he does, he will find further along the block, a slightly different residential landscape of condominiums, built in the 70s and 80s, and with uber-English monikers like The Bentley, The Wilshire, The Leonard and so on. Clearly, three hundred years after Independence, nostalgia for the Colonial Era still runs deep.

*   *   *   *  *

33 – The American Academy of Dramatic Arts, housed in the original Colony Club building (1904) designed by architect Stanford White. The Colony Club was a private social club for wealthy women.

33 – The American Academy of Dramatic Arts, housed in the original Colony Club building (1904) designed by architect Stanford White. The Colony Club was a private social club for wealthy women.

34 – The Crooked Knife: an English-style Pub and Tavern serving Italian food.

34 – The Crooked Knife: an English-style Pub and Tavern serving Italian food.

36 – No. 112: The modern, steel and glass façade of the Jewish Braille institute of America.

36 – No. 112: The modern, steel and glass façade of the Jewish Braille institute of America.

37 – No. 117: Dutch-inspired gabled roof.

37 – No. 117: Dutch-inspired gabled roof.

38 – No. 124: A red brick townhouse with green awnings.

38 – No. 124: A red brick townhouse with green awnings.

39 – Henry George – possibly the most patriotic, British-sounding name ever – School of Social Sciences (1932).

39 – Henry George – possibly the most patriotic, British-sounding name ever – School of Social Sciences (1932).

40 – Ramada Inn, originally the Rutledge Hotel (1924). The building has Italianate flourishes, and channels similar tenement buildings in Boston.

40 – Ramada Inn, originally the Rutledge Hotel (1924). The building has Italianate flourishes, and channels similar tenement buildings in Boston.

41 – No. 138: Stunning French-New Orleans flourishes.

41 – No. 138: Stunning French-New Orleans flourishes.

42 – No. 159: The Bentley Apartments.

42 – No. 159: The Bentley Apartments.

43 – Nos. 210 – 198: a further row of residential townhouses. No. 208 is the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences.

43 – Nos. 210 – 198: a further row of residential townhouses. No. 208 is the Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences.

44 – No. 207: The Wilshire Apartments.

44 – No. 207: The Wilshire Apartments.

D - Boston, 1775 A.D.

D – Boston, 1775 A.D.

 

 

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About Kennie Ting

I am a wandering cityophile and pattern-finder who is pathologically incapable of staying in one place for any long period of time. When I do, I see the place from different perspectives, obsessive-compulsively.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Art & Architecture, Culture & Lifestyle, Landmarks & History, New York, Photography and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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